is this seriously a review for an album?

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BlackRoija
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Post by BlackRoija » Mon September 17th, 2012, 6:51 pm

SlashAndThrash wrote:blackroija open a music blog called Dancing about architecture. its genius.
I'll link it to my other blog about my experiences with drugs: Only Meth Is Real.

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Post by Metalfreak » Mon September 17th, 2012, 7:57 pm

stewvee wrote:And get SCREAM BLOODY GORE to write drunken reviews for it.
this.
They had you do a drug test and the forgot to test for drugs???

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Post by Kaganator » Tue September 18th, 2012, 9:10 am

stewvee wrote:And get SCREAM BLOODY GORE to write drunken reviews for it.

ROFL.

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Post by badcarburetor » Tue September 18th, 2012, 11:10 am

Odinson666 wrote:I have always thought of skate boarding as dancing to architecture
Touche.
"God created the devil? At least he did *something* cool." Homer J. Simpson

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Post by badcarburetor » Tue September 18th, 2012, 11:14 am

BlackRoija wrote: Even our own brains work that way; you don't hear a voice as well if you can't see a mouth forming the words.
I guess that's why talk radio never really took off.
"God created the devil? At least he did *something* cool." Homer J. Simpson

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Post by badcarburetor » Tue September 18th, 2012, 11:35 am

stewvee wrote:
badcarburetor wrote:I just love that quote and the mystery behind it. There is something to it and nothing to it at all.
I HATE HATE HATE it. It's used all the time as a sort of "smart bomb," and it's really just the equivalent of a long greasy fart.
The clear rebuttal being DLR's line about why reviewers prefer Elvis Costello to his band, (paraphrased) "They all look like him." To which Elvis had his own witty retort. It's really a big circle jerk. My favorite part of the whole thing is that it's all based on a (likely) Martin fucking Mull quip that forty years later still gets panties in a wad.

All of these comments are the kind of thing that musicians who are feeling pissy about a bad review throw down. All have elements of truth and yet are also intellectualized bullshit. Writing about music can be beautiful. It can make the reader experience music in ways they had not imagined previously. It can also be complete overcooked and indulgent blather about nothing more than a writer's cry for validation.

Are Bukowski, Thompson and Bangs genius writers? Is it annoying as fuck to read immature twelfth generation knock-offs who truly believe they are unique and are wordsmiths themselves within the medium of criticism (which they use only a launching pad for their own self-indulgent musings), but are really nothing more than twits who deny the power of a good hard editing? Maybe and maybe not, because none of this matters except in the mind's eye of the receiving reader; does it impact them in a manner that exceeds petty annoyance? To me that is the worst failing possible.

Ultimately, if one puts "art" out into the world whether of the original or critical bent one must accept that they have made themselves open to criticism, accountability and, maybe, even being revered.
"God created the devil? At least he did *something* cool." Homer J. Simpson

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Post by stewvee » Wed September 19th, 2012, 12:51 pm

The thing is, and I believe in this as much as American made beer, is that anyone can write a fuckin record review. Everyone has an opinion about a record. And it's incredibly interesting to talk to someone about records who doesn't write record reviews for money.

But the Big Problem now is a lot of people DO write record reviews. They self-publish on blogs. Contribute "gratis" to online "mags." Click out a few run-ons on Facebook, Tumblr, whatever. And, of course, the idea behind the art of it is mostly lost. And the "curiosity" on the potential audience's behalf all but flatlines.

Buke, Thompson, Bangs, (I'll add Meltzer, Tosches, and Pearlman to this) are phenomenal writers. They all share an innate ability to take their inner voices and ensnare them in ink. Their writing is what happens when bullshit-free insight collides with sometimes (too much) intelligence and a highly stylized way of delineating art.

Problem with these guys is most of these kids who are self-publishing or writing for online "mags" or whatever, interpret what Buke, et al, have done incorrectly. It's kind of like the guy who sees Thelonious Monk play and thinks he can do that and maybe better, and doesn't need lessons or to learn the classics.

Conversely, you've got the ever growing group of kids who think sterile, AP copy stylized "one-sheet" regurgitation is not only one way of writing about art, but it's, in fact, the ONLY way.

I grew up with mags that featured Bangs, Meltzer, Tosches, PJ O'Rourke, Thompson, etc. I remember reading this insane Rolling Stones show review by Bukowski in Creem. I remember Meltzer writing about wrestling when he was supposed to be writing about Pat Benatar, or Tosches talking about shrooming and cow-tipping when he was allegedly writing about the Allman Bros.

These guys didn't really always "write about the music." But they wrote about life. The life the music existed in. And their work was better for it. It's entertainment, and they were writing about a mode of entertainment. If I'm a musician, and my record ends up facilitating a 1,400 word digression on psilocybin and slipping in cowshit, it's a win. Same goes for whoever, besides the musician, reads said digression.

At the end of the day, it's an increasingly more fucked up world where people find any number of things to enrage them online. Writing about art, regardless of how it's configured, should not be one of those things. And it won't be if it's (1) written honestly, with nothing to gain from it (read: more promos, or money, or free admittance to shows, or admittance into "elite: twitter/facebook/online "mag" cliques); (2) it's written "hard," from the lap and brain, and (3) it's written with purpose.
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Post by Brian » Wed September 19th, 2012, 1:08 pm

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/HmJbJs-9ST0?ve ... ram><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/HmJbJs-9ST0?version=3&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="560" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

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BlackRoija
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Post by BlackRoija » Wed September 19th, 2012, 2:06 pm

I actually expected the money to come pouring in after posting this review copied from my RYM account to the Wrekage website. To date, no dice...

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Post by badcarburetor » Wed September 19th, 2012, 2:44 pm

stewvee wrote:But the Big Problem now is a lot of people DO write record reviews. They self-publish on blogs. Contribute "gratis" to online "mags." Click out a few run-ons on Facebook, Tumblr, whatever. And, of course, the idea behind the art of it is mostly lost. And the "curiosity" on the potential audience's behalf all but flatlines. .
Absolutely. The downside of the this glorious modern age of technology is access, access of artists to us and us to artists, and to critics and to each other and...Punk rock said, "Anyone can do it" and some wise(acre) followed up with, "...but not everyone should." Now everyone does everything all the time.
stewvee wrote:Buke, Thompson, Bangs, (I'll add Meltzer, Tosches, and Pearlman to this) are phenomenal writers. They all share an innate ability to take their inner voices and ensnare them in ink. Their writing is what happens when bullshit-free insight collides with sometimes (too much) intelligence and a highly stylized way of delineating art.

Problem with these guys is most of these kids who are self-publishing or writing for online "mags" or whatever, interpret what Buke, et al, have done incorrectly. It's kind of like the guy who sees Thelonious Monk play and thinks he can do that and maybe better, and doesn't need lessons or to learn the classics.
Absolutely. It's like every yahoo says when they go to an exhibit of modern art (because yahoos spend a lot of time in museums), "My kid coulda done that and she's only two." Yeah, sure pal, but your kid didn't do that, did they, and neither did you. The same as been said about every new form of non-high art. Forms need to be learned, history needs to be absorbed, otherwise art is created in a vacuum with no sense of perspective. On a rare ocassion that serves to create something amazing, but most of the time it's just self indugent tripe for the lazy.
stewvee wrote:Conversely, you've got the ever growing group of kids who think sterile, AP copy stylized "one-sheet" regurgitation is not only one way of writing about art, but it's, in fact, the ONLY way.
Well, those kinds are really just lobbying for positions in PR firms, aren't they? Not that there is anything wrong with that...
stewvee wrote:I grew up with mags that featured Bangs, Meltzer, Tosches, PJ O'Rourke, Thompson, etc. I remember reading this insane Rolling Stones show review by Bukowski in Creem. I remember Meltzer writing about wrestling when he was supposed to be writing about Pat Benatar, or Tosches talking about shrooming and cow-tipping when he was allegedly writing about the Allman Bros.

These guys didn't really always "write about the music." But they wrote about life. The life the music existed in. And their work was better for it. It's entertainment, and they were writing about a mode of entertainment. If I'm a musician, and my record ends up facilitating a 1,400 word digression on psilocybin and slipping in cowshit, it's a win. Same goes for whoever, besides the musician, reads said digression.
Without a doubt we grew up on the same stuff at the same time. We were lucky. There will never be a zine to compare with the heyday of CREEM. It was without a doubt the high water (or high Boy Howdy Beer) mark for rock n' roll journalism. It was a religion to those guys and gals and it wasn't full of face saving irony.

There have been writers since then that really got what that style meant and how rock n' roll can be the only thing that keeps the heart beating. Flipside was a great magazine full of passionate writers. Jeff Bale has published some great stuff over the years in various outlets. Sadly, I can't think of many more modern examples. There are a number of writers/zines/ect...that I enjoy, but none hit the level of passion AND uniqueness that ruined my life way back when.
stewvee wrote:At the end of the day, it's an increasingly more fucked up world where people find any number of things to enrage them online. Writing about art, regardless of how it's configured, should not be one of those things. And it won't be if it's (1) written honestly, with nothing to gain from it (read: more promos, or money, or free admittance to shows, or admittance into "elite: twitter/facebook/online "mag" cliques); (2) it's written "hard," from the lap and brain, and (3) it's written with purpose.
Again, with the access. It's always easier and safer to tear down another person's creation than it is to build something unique.

Overall, I think we come from - and are looking towards - the same place. That said, don't you think a whole lot of those early guys really appreciated the medium for the perks (living life on the sidelines of rock stars who had already amassed the parties, the chicks, the drugs, the lifestyle and now only needed the smart guys to build the myth around them). Of course it wasn't what drove them to it in the first place, but I think that it didn't hurt their sticking around.
"God created the devil? At least he did *something* cool." Homer J. Simpson

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Post by stewvee » Wed September 19th, 2012, 3:46 pm

A lot of those folks writing the one-sheet reviews are already PR people. And they often write about bands they do PR for! Ha ha ha. Great.

And I know all those iconic rock writers enjoyed the perks. Bangs talked a lot about it. So did Meltzer. They were rock fans who stumbled into a profession. Some could handle it. Some couldn't.

I'm so glad I was born in the 70s.
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Post by Holiday Rambler » Tue October 2nd, 2012, 1:39 pm


SlashAndThrash
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Post by SlashAndThrash » Tue October 2nd, 2012, 6:05 pm

lol
G.O.R.E.
Billy and Agnes wrote:JUST LIKE HAVING A WAAART REMOOOVED

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Post by SlashAndThrash » Tue October 2nd, 2012, 6:07 pm

also LOL at the insinuation that retro thrash is still a thing anyone cares about, let alone trying to jump on the bandwagon of. there's what, one oldschool styled thrash band active in the city
G.O.R.E.
Billy and Agnes wrote:JUST LIKE HAVING A WAAART REMOOOVED

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Post by AmoebicDysentery » Wed October 3rd, 2012, 10:19 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HsbM16UrZs
According to the blog profile it's the vocalist/keyboardist from this band...Seems like he's got a bit of a crush on some Wizard Smoke members. Watch your cornhole, man.

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